The New Generation show presents a variety of our carefully selected graduate work from the four Scottish Art Schools and it demonstrates our continuing commitment to recognising and supporting each new generation at this important and exciting start of their professional development. Many of today’s young graduates become tomorrow’s solo exhibitors, lecturers and curators. We are always struck by the creative ideas, energy and skills of those on the threshold of their future careers. In recent years, a mix of international students and huge technological developments and processes have brought a new slant to the Degree Shows. Amongst this year’s graduates, there is much focus on imaginative conceptual work, however Compass, for this exhibition, still seeks out and finds excellent examples of the more conventional and traditional methods and skills. The combination of all these aspects of today’s contemporary art, is what makes it so interesting. We hope that you will join us for an insight into what is going on in the minds of today’s developing young artists. We invite you to join us at the opening of the exhibition on Saturday 1st July 2017 from 1.30 to 4.30pm.

Compass Gallery is proud to be presenting a new exhibition by one of Scotland’s most dedicated and talented painters, Peter Thomson. He has had numerous solo exhibitions with us since his first major show in 1995 after graduating from Glasgow School of Art. The many admirers and collectors familiar with the subject and style of Peter’s paintings will have a startling surprise. In his newest work, he seems to challenge himself and his viewers to change direction and their expectations of his more familiar style and subject matter. Thomson is a serious minded and responsible artist, constantly observing, thinking and responding to the world around him, but his underlying success as a painter is deeply rooted in his inner passions and constant exploration and admiration of the 20th Century Masters. The Post Impressionist style of painting continues to be a major influence; Vuillard, Bonnard, Seurat, Sickert are amongst the artists whose painting he believes remain unsurpassed. He says “The importance to me is that I consider these painters to have regarded their subject matter as being equally crucial as exploring the inherent qualities and possibilities of the materials they used.” Examining the technique and handling of the images inspires him. Studying images of Degas and Rembrandt are now vehicles for developing and exploring his own skills in creating some of his newest paintings. (“Combing the hair, after Degas”) and (“Hendricke Bathing, after Rembrandt”). So why does Peter paint these subjects? Thomson acknowledges that certain ideas and passions deep within himself certainly resonate subconsciously, for example, his enjoyment in Greek mythology and his sporting interests. They are formed and developed over many years and intuitively permeate his thoughts and working methods. Peter paints what he is passionate about. Painting in the wake of artists like of Edward Hopper, and Vilhelm Hammershoi interests him and they are, he feels, closest to the spirit or sensibility of his own paintings. (“Junction”) and (“Briggait Wash Area”). Inspired by their handling of paint he is also influenced by their daring subject matter, themes and concerns of the day. Thomson is enthused by the subdued portraits and interiors of these Post Impressionist artists and their muted tones continue to display much influence. Thomson feels that painting should always be organic in its nature and for it to be more subjective in meaning and he feels that, how paintings are read is influenced by an individual’s personal life experiences. He is not concerned about creating something that has a particular meaning or purpose yet, observing this new body of painting, they clearly do. These paintings are his “observations of the unremarkable and unspectacular” – to him everything is endlessly interesting. However, the paintings reflect his daily journey through life. They are often bustling and intriguing, they shout quietly about his own personal thoughts and experiences. (“Hermes”) and (“Workshop”). Accidental discoveries throw up endlessly interesting visual inspiration behind which lies deeply personal thoughtfulness and explanation. A recent trigger of inspiration was during an afternoon in his studio attic, when Peter stood on an old television set by accident; the broken item, its wires and inner workings inadvertently interested him. The stark, empty abandoned phone boxes offering shelter (“Phone Box, Aikenhead Road”) and (“Phone Box, Cathcart”) perhaps are a reflection on the experience and challenges a serious and committed artist such as Thomson must endure. There is still an abiding interest in landscape, but his sharp observation of the disintegration of industrial, statuesque objects such as the rusting carcass of an abandoned helicopter (“Abandoned Helicopter, Thornhill”) and the acid burned car batteries, we wonder are perhaps metaphors for a variety of contemporary issues and his commitment to his own conscience and political ideologies. Other paintings in the show are gentle and poignant, always deeply personal and thought provoking (“The Field”). This is a strong and unique exhibition not to be missed and we look forward to opening the gallery doors on the opening evening of 6th April 2017.

Works by gallery artists and recent graduates, alongside some Modern Scottish Masters.

A fresh and exciting combination of original Paintings, Drawings, Prints and Sculpture by some of our regular contemporary exhibitors, hung along side, a selection of Modern Scottish Masters.

Life as an artist is often a lonely existence, but John Johnstone is a true artist, working alone with commitment in his studio for most of his life. Celebrating this dedication and creativity spanning four decades, Compass Gallery is presenting this solo exhibition of his most recent work together with rarely seen drawings and paintings from earlier in his career - "My works are a visual diary of the people, places and things that populate my life and mind." Success in London has absorbed most of his recent paintings so this timely exhibition in Compass Gallery provides a wonderful opportunity for Scotland, particularly Glasgow to see the full scale and depth of his work. John Johnstone is a story teller. A life spent dreaming thinking and observing he creates paintings that are observed from everyday life illustrating social narratives. Quirky or allegorical - they often stress the extraordinary quality of ordinary life and his newest paintings are no different. "As a student in Dundee in the 1960s, I began to paint scenes from the dark side of life. Life was serious - the news often depressing - so I thought that I would reflect that in my paintings and the artists I became interested in were painting troubled and disturbing images. Painters like Soutine, Kokoschka, Schiele and Bacon. After college I got used to working alone and the paintings became less disturbing. The events had a less powerful impact upon me. There are problems that are common to us all - but I found that humour was a way of coping with the difficulties of life. I began to notice the work of Stanley Spencer and Edward Burra which contained an element of humour and in the case of Burra, very sardonic humour. So this feeling began to appear in my work." Prompted by his recent research visits to Glasgow for this exhibition, he has fondly looked at familiar Glasgow locations and to some of its famous cultural sons and daughters for inspiration "this exhibition is in a way a homage to Glasgow and its many famous painters, musicians and writers I admire." The fundamental importance and practise of drawing and figure composition is the foundation of Johnstone's work and teaching, it is still an integral part of his life. A tutor at Duncan of Jordanstone, Dundee, he has been drawing compulsively since childhood developing a sound knowledge of the anatomy of the human body - this allows him the freedom to distort his figures to add an element of humour to his work. johnstone's work has always been popular, surreal and naive in style, the details, the colour and observed storytelling appealing to a wide audience, however in this exhibition there is also an opportunity for the viewer to look more deeply at the more thoughtful and expressive side of his work and his raison d'etre as an artist.

A selection of 19th - 21st Century British paintings, drawings and sculpture including works by the Modern British & Scottish Masters, Scottish Colourists, Glasgow School, Blackadder, Colquhoun & MacBryde, Cowie, Eardley, Herman, Kay, Lanyon, Paterson, Power, Vaughan and a selection of invited Contemporaries.

The New Generation show presents a variety of our carefully selected graduate work from the four Scottish Art Schools.

Why is Compass Gallery exhibiting a poster show? Because all good design and all fine art shows a basic knowledge and understanding of the visual language. Collectors of fine paintings and prints respond to visual images in the same way as collectors of rare, well designed posters, plus you get the film too! We have carefully selected over two hundred original film posters. Many of these were designed by well known artists of the genre and are highly collectable. We hope that you will queue up and buy a ticket and ice cream, come and see the show...it will be a visual treat! "Film posters were born in an era rich in poster tradition throughout the western world. An era generally considered to be the golden age of the poster. The public were used to seeing Toulouse Lautrec posters for the Moulin Rouge, Alphonse Mucha and Pierre Bonnard posters with their brilliant colours and few words, pasted on advertising boards. The early film posters, with their beautiful full colour art, were in complete contrast to the black and white films which they represented. In the early days of cinema the main source of advertising was through poster art. This was the public's first exposure to what they could see at the cinema, and the posters therefore had to entice the viewer. When the films had finished their run in the cinema, the poster for the following feature would be pasted over the previous one. The posters and lobby cards loaned to the cinemas were meant to be returned to the poster exchanges. In many cases they were returned and kept stored in the warehouses until the Second World War, when owing to paper shortages many of the posters were recycled. The advertising material that remained was rented out to cinemas if the films were re-released. In the late 1960s and early 1970s there were a handful of people dealing in cinema memorabilia. It was more profitable for the owners of the poster exchanges to sell the items to these people than to wait for a small rental fee. A number of cinemas did not return their posters or lobby cards, and these were stored on their premises and then discovered many years later. Owing to the fact that film posters and lobby cards were not really accessible until the 1960s, they are a relatively new area of collecting. Like many great novels and works of music that are now cherished, their commercial origins kept them from being taken seriously when they were first produced. In contrast, comics and baseball cards were collected in the 1930s and 1940s and are now an extremely established market. In the 1990s a Boris Karloff poster for The Mummy 1932, sold for $452,000 in New York. This sale really was instrumental in not only bringing film poster art to a wider audience, but also elevating it to a serious art form. Many major institutions, including MOMA, The Library of Congress and the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, have all formed their own collections of film posters. Film historians and other academics have documented the importance of the role of films in the twentieth century. Films are a cultural artefact, created by people from different backgrounds, and reflecting a diverse array of cultures. Bringing images to the big screen has influenced changes in fashion, beauty and design. This collection represents nine decades of our ever changing society" B Marchant. 2016

Returning from recent trips to the remote Sutherland and Caithness area of Scotland and also from Norway; still beaming with excitement, Gregor brought his sketchbooks into the gallery and informed us that he was truly inspired by the stark crags and stacks at Duncansby as well as the startling Norwegian landforms - a true vision of where land meets sea - and as a result he has embarked upon this series of dramatic paintings and prints. Belinda Rush Jansen studied sculpture at Edinburgh College of Art, graduating in 1983. Tutored by Vincent Butler, she learned to use stone, marble and bronze. A regular exhibitor at the RSA, she was awarded Best Female Sculptor in 1996. She has numerous works in Public and Private Collections. As a child Belinda moved to Scotland, spending most of her early years on the Black Isle, amidst the beautiful, natural surroundings. Her love for wild and domestic animals has been inherent and apparent from a young age, and using the traditional materials of the sculptor, she manages to convey a deep affection for these animals. Her love and affinity with the countryside and nature is evident, and her portrayal of the animals in her environment show a firm tenderness and lifelong knowledge of being around these creatures. Comforted and inspired by the natural world, her carvings explore the essence of animal and human spirit in primal symbolic and heartfelt ways. She returns to the Gallery with a new body of figurative works. Pivotal to Belinda's new stone carvings, the Seven Selves of Female, she says, "Wild landscape and the timeless female purpose of bearing forth, nurture and spiritual connections are the core of my work, alongside the equally mysterious intelligence of wild creatures". Her sculpture has many recognisable paths of experience for others to resonate with. They are very personal and tactile, and reflect her interest in cave art, Eskimo nomadic carvings, Egyptian and Chinese tomb animals and their spiritual symbolism.

A Selection of 19th - 21st century British Paintings, Drawings and Sculpture, including works by Joan Eardley, Scottish Colourists, St Ives School and selected Contemporary Modern Masters and New Graduates.

Modern British & Contemporary Art Fair . Islington Business and Design Centre. Stand G21. 20 - 24 January 2016

The Winter Show opens on 12 November 2015. This is a seasonal exhibition of changing works throughout November and December 2015 and January 2016. It is an intriguing mix of new works, including original Paintings, Prints and Sculpture by some of our regular contemporary exhibitors, hung along side, a selection of Modern Scottish Masters.

Ashley Cook, Printmaker, creates works that are narrative, focusing on the human form, with the titles having a central position. She creates photomontage illusionist environments from disparate sources. Cook works with a mixture of found images and her own autographic and photographic images; she utilises an eclectic library of personal and archetypal iconography which she reuses, redevelops and manipulates continuously. Cook uses an intense palette of colour opposites that create a dreamlike and sometimes nocturnal quality to her work. The work of Joseph Cornell, Frida Kahlo, Rene Magritte, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg and Hieronymus Bosch were early sources of inspiration – she says her own work is essentially emotionally driven. Making prints remains a cathartic process for her. The works featured in this show are concerned with processes of psychological change, journeys to break with self defeating patterns; fearful of breaking with time honoured coping mechanisms, the prints are nocturnal with the qualities of troubled dreams. Ashley graduated from Glasgow School of Art with First Class BA Hons in 1986 and Postgraduate Printmaking in 1987 And has since continued to practice as a professional artist, winning awards, exhibiting internationally and undertaking Many international residencies, and teaching printmaking in a wide range of countries. Ashley and Compass Gallery have a long standing relationship, which started with her participation in our New Generation Show in 1986. She featured as one of the ‘Five Girls from Glasgow’, an exhibition presented in 1990 when Glasgow was the Capital City of Culture. This exhibition focussed on the prominent place that young women artists, talented, gifted and intelligent occupy nowadays. Cook has work in a number of prestigious collections nationally and internationally including: the Scottish Arts Council; The BBC; The Scotland Office; Kelvingrove Museum & Art Gallery, Glasgow; The Vaasa Museum, Finland and Galeria Otra Vez, Los Angeles; Museograbado, Mexico; Sala Ramona, Barcelona. She has exhibited widely throughout the UK and internationally.

Adrian Wiszniewski rose to prominence in 1984 after graduating from Glasgow School of Art then presenting his first one-man show in Compass Gallery. He has continued to exhibit with Compass Gallery and Cyril Gerber Fine Art throughout his career. This exhibition of new paintings and works on paper celebrates the 30th anniversary of that first solo show.

The New Generation show presents a variety of our carefully selected graduate work from the four Scottish Art Schools. It demonstrates our continuing commitment to recognising and supporting each new generation at this important and exciting start of their professional development. We are always struck by the creative ideas, energy and skills of those on the threshold of their future career. It is very interesting to us to find that some of today’s young graduates become tomorrow’s solo exhibitors, lecturers and curators. We believe that this year’s new arrivals will be no exception. We hope that you will join us and share our enthusiasm

Anna’s degree show stood out for us for its skill in painting and intellectual, imaginative thought provoking content. Her life experiences coming from Holland to Scotland and the environment of Orkney, have shaped and informed Anna’s thinking together with the awareness and sensitivity of world events and its effects on humanity and our global environment.

Graduate of Glasgow School of Art, 1955. New and Recent Paintings, inspired by his life in Mexico, London, New York and his various expeditions to Mauritania, Eastern Ecuador and Timbuktu.

The intimate format of a ‘Cabinet Exhibition’ is ideal for the habit of collecting small treasures. Based on the idea of Cabinet Paintings which originated as far back as the 17th Century, these were small paintings, preparatory drawings, small portraits, relief’s and sculptures, which were produced by some of the greatest artists in history for the private enjoyment of individuals and collectors. These were displayed in specially designed cabinets and eventually many artists produced works specifically for these displays

Visiting Peter Thomson in his studio to discuss his paintings for this new exhibition, I am again struck by his skill and fertile imagination. Throughout his work Peter quietly explores his own deep feelings, thoughts, and responses to a wide range of contemporary issues. Drawing inspiration from his own conscience and political ideologies, and reflecting on life events at home and his travels to the other side of the world, his paintings are often puzzling and intriguing. Conversation unravels the thought-provoking mysteries and enlightens understanding of his often deeply personal and poignant images. Peter’s admiration of those 20th century artists who changed the way of painting, through their subject matter and their exploration of the possibilities of the materials they used, continue to inspire and inform his practice. This exhibition explores many subjects - the issues of risk taking, relationships, the environment, the games people play and the complications of male-female power struggles. Together with his desire to improve his skill and craftsmanship he speaks his mind with intensity and integrity. The images, some tender, some reflective, some playful, reflect his awareness and observations of the world around him. Peter Thomson’s paintings are a journey into the creative mind of a truly thinking and imaginative artist.

Lesley banks, a graduate of Glasgow school of Art with BA Honours in Drawing & Painting in 1984, has exhibited with compass gallery throughout the thirty years of her career. She has won numerous awards and exhibited widely throughout the UK and abroad. She has won numerous awards and exhibited widely throughout the UK and abroad. Her work is held in several public collections. Lesley returns to Compass Gallery with a fresh new body of work, inspired whilst developing paintings for her participation in our 2013 Allotment eexhibition 'Still Spaces'. "I have a tendency to work in themes, especially when working towards a solo show. I usually have the entire exhibition planned in my head and so my studio becomes full of paintings at various stages of completion. This can be overwhelming at times especially as I work in a home studio - it is hard to find breathing space. Throughout the course of the year i have found myself increasingly attracted to local allotment communities. This is not the most obvious place to think about leisure since these are also places of hard work. But, in the middle of the city where gardens can be in short supply, they allow some insights into the dramatic changes which nature affects. Who knew there were so many shades of green, which necessitated a total change of palette and the purchase of prohibitively expensive oil paint. To complement these studies of nature in its many guises I also explored the architectural splendour of the Kibble Palace in the Botanic Gardens, Glasgow. Outside in the rain, with the early morning diffused light, I peered through the walls of glass panes, seeing the structure reflected and distorted amongst the fish in the pond. Again, whilst looking in, I was drawn to the abstract pattern of leaves pressing against the windows of the Palm House. The theme of leisure continues throughout the exhibition. A busy west end cafe, Epicures of Hyndland, also caught my attention because of its glass walls - this time bringing the outside world in. Whether it was a sunny day with the sun streaming through the windows and bouncing off the outside tables or a quiet wet winter night with the windows steamy, it always seems to be buzzing with regulars. In their own unique ways, these places provide breathing space." Lesley Banks.

Jack Knox - Paintings Drawings & Pastels from 1950s to present dayJack Knox - Paintings Drawings & Pastels from 1950s to present dayJack Knox - Paintings Drawings & Pastels from 1950s to present dayJack Knox - Paintings Drawings & Pastels from 1950s to present day

Since graduating, Helen has had several solo exhibitions including Galerie A.T, Poland, Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh, Crawford Arts Centre, St Andrews, Rebecca Hossack Gallery, London, and Compass Gallery, Glasgow. She is the Recipient of numerous Awards and Grants including Emma Sachs Prize for Drawing, Scottish Arts Council Bursary & Small Assistance Award, British Council Scholarship to study at the State Higher School of Fine Art, Poland, Grant from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, New York and Armour Award from the Royal Glasgow Institute of the Fine Arts to name a few. Her work is held in the following collections : Scottish Arts Council; Edinburgh City Arts Centre; Dick Institute, Kilmarnock; Smith Art Gallery and Museum, Stirling; Glasgow Museum and Art Gallery; Flemings Bank, London and Strathclyde University. “Helen Flockhart is a scarce commodity in modern art. She is that rare and precious being – a genuine image- maker. There are two distinctive types of painting in Flockhart’s oeuvre- the single figure, icon style pictures and then the narrative, genre-type work, where one or more figures are involved in some strange and intriguing scenario.Both kinds of picture create weird dream- like imagery of a very enigmatic nature. Her pictures remind us that painting is not a straight forward, unmitigated reflection of our world. On the contrary, she presents to us, not a dependent view of reality, but another,alternative world, which we can recognise and enter as much through out imaginations and memories as with our eyes. As with all true image – makers, Helen Flockhart’s art cuts through the outward skin of mere surface appearances to present us with disturbing pictures of our other, denied selves.” Bill Hare

The increasing popularity of owning and cultivating a plot and ‘growing your own’ has particular socio, economic, political and environmental relevance today. This prompted us to invite selected artists to interpret the theme and create a special work for our exhibition. The artist’s vary greatly in style and medium, so, exploring this wide and fascinating subject, their interpretation of the social and cultural impact of the allotment heritage in Scotland with the history, the structures, the people and their crops will, we are sure provide an uplifting sensory and visual experience for the onlooker. Allotments, Still Spaces, even tiny patches of carefully tended earth, provide not just physical sustenance but also endless hours of spiritual and emotional comfort and joy.

4 – 27 April 2013 Twenty-eight years ago, Compass Gallery first presented in the New Generation Show the talented new graduate of Glasgow School of Art, Peter Thomson. His creativity and imagination was immediately evident. His first solo show in 1995 was followed by several successful Compass exhibitions including a collaboration with Piccadilly Gallery, Cork Street, London. Peter continues to work steadily, further cementing his reputation as one of the most imaginative and significant artists living and working in the UK today. Although he has shown consistently with Compass Gallery over the years, this is his first major solo exhibition in Scotland since 1995(?). The appreciation of an artist’s home audience is extremely important, so Compass is proud to have this opportunity of presenting his newest body of work. A studio visit to Peter is always thought-provoking and invites discussion. The paintings offer a glimpse into his personal observations and triggers of inspiration. Thomson is a serious minded and responsible artist who has always reflected on a variety of contemporary issues through his paintings. Influenced by his commitment to his own conscience and political ideologies, Thomson believes that “For some considerable time much of the Arts establishment has consigned painting, particularly figurative painting to the margins of what is considered credible art practice. The established orthodoxy is now what is widely referred to as conceptual art. To my mind this is as much a triumph of marketing rather than a general recognition and acceptance that the more established traditions are of little contemporary relevance. In my own practice I have been unable, or rather unwilling to stray from the influences that initially provoked me to lift a paintbrush. The post impressionist era provided the most sophisticated and beautiful examples of painting which in my opinion remain unsurpassed. Vuillard, Bonnard, Vallaton, Redon, Suerat, Sickert and Gwen John. Followed in the 20th century by William Orpen, Roger Fry, Balthus, Paul Nash, Eric Ravilious & Edward Hopper. In the 21st century we have the astonishing painting of Lucien Freud, Peter Doig and Goran Djurovic who have progressed in the traditions of these artists. I could add to these lists without limit. Their importance to me is that I consider these painters to have regarded their subject matter as being equally crucial as exploring the inherent qualities and possibilities of the materials they used. This crossover or fusion of content and aesthetics is what fascinates me most and what I attempt to address in my own work.” Thomson’s works are painted with great intensity and integrity as he quietly works away with complete dedication, tenacity and passion. He brings to his practise the knowledge, skill and background, which enable him to explore and express his deep feelings and thoughts. The works sit on the wall with quiet determination, they speak for themselves and hold their own in many major public and private collections sitting comfortably alongside the masters that Peter cites as his greatest influences.

31 January – 23 February 2013 Drawing is a vital part of every creative process. It can be one of the most direct forms of human communication, enabling artists through looking and seeing to explore and understand the world around them (David Hockney). Drawing is a hard discipline requiring time and dedication. We believe it is time for us to look again at how images are made, and to place a greater value and focus on drawing and draughtsmanship. Susan Eaton, Ronald Rae, Lys Hansen, Lara Scouller, Andrew Lennie, Rebecca Westguard Scott McMurdo, Seven contemporary artists with their own individual styles, whom we have invited to freely express their creativity and imagination with their expert and powerful ability to draw.

Angela Steel’s series of seven stained glass panels ‘Tangled Routs’ tells the powerful story of a girl incarcerated. The room she inhabits is filled with the fiery motifs of the childhood she tries to hold on to as she resists the change which adulthood bestows upon her. A meditation on where she came from, where she is going, and what lies on the other side of the door, culminates in these seven new panels.

For over 30 years, Compass Gallery has set a precedent of visiting all the Scottish Degree shows. It is an opportunity for the gallery’s directors Cyril and Jill Gerber, to make contact with the young artists, and select then exhibit the most interesting and exciting works in the New Generation exhibition. Compass Gallery is supported by Glasgow City Council -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Current Exhibitions 28th October 2011 - 19th November 2011 The Force and Form of Memory - page 1 We are very excited about this exhibition. What happens when you ask a group of creative and imaginative artists to explore the theme of Memory? You’ll probably get a myriad of different answers. Perhaps a family holiday, the lyrics of a song, a trip to the theatre, a feeling of peace in a familiar place, a loved friend or relative losing their memory, a story from the past, your favourite comfy chair, the day that we won the Cup, wartime reminiscences. We selected and invited a group of 76 artists from across Scotland, and some from further afield, to create a special work with their own interpretation of the theme. The artists vary greatly in style, age and background. Amongst those participating, there are established Royal Scottish Academicians, senior art school lecturers, full time painters, sculptors and recent graduates. Some work in bronze, some in glass, others are figurative or surrealist painters and printmakers. So the interpretations of the theme could be very wide apart. Anything from narrative to a psychological study, a visual metaphor or treasured reminiscence. In fact the exhibition could be quite a surprise package as much to us as to you, ranging from the obvious and predictable to the somewhat unexpected. Each specially chosen artist has his or her own individual response to the topic, creating a lasting sensory and visual experience for the onlooker. There will be humour, melancholy, pathos, fear, happiness, joy and all the emotions that make up the human spirit. The response of these artists has been fantastic, with many saying that the subject was inspirational, touching them in a personal sense. The works in this exhibition explore ‘The Force and Form of Memory’ and the impact it has on our lives. The Arts play a vitally important role, enhancing the quality of our day to day lives. However, their importance as cognitive decline sets in for people with dementia is not yet really understood or appreciated. Often a person who may not have spoken for a long time, may suddenly remember a past event or person. This sudden return of memory can be triggered by seeing an image, an object, or even hearing a particular piece of music. Compass Gallery is working in partnership with Alzheimer Scotland, raising awareness of the importance of creating today’s memories, which will become future reminiscences, and the impact that memory-loss related illness have on the lives of those affected by dementia. All works are for sale. Compass Gallery’s commission will be shared with Alzheimer Scotland. We hope that you will come along and see, hopefully purchase from this fascinating exhibition. The exhibition will be touring throughout Scotland, and may vary slightly from venue to venue. Please contact the gallery for further details.

On our many visits to the annual Art School Degree Shows over the past 40 years, there is the rare and exhilarating occasion when we know instantly that we have found an exciting ‘New Generation’ artist, with talent, skill and a strong ability to express what they have to say. There have been just a handful of painters to whom at this point, at the start of their career, we have offered a first solo show after graduating. Scott McMurdo is one of these artists.It can take some time during the challenging period between leaving the shelter and support of the art school tutors, to finding a studio, and establishing their own direction as a professional artist.

Craig Peacock, a Glasgow School of Art graduate, 1985, is one of these painters that Compass Gallery spotted early on and included in the annual New Generation show. Ten years later, having exhibited widely, both internationally and nationally, he had his first solo exhibition in Compass. An artist who has serious talent and a desire to express his ideas visually, deserves greater recognition. His ideas are both outward looking and introspective. His virtuosity in tackling such breadth of thoughts, cast him variously as observer, commentator, philosopher and confessor. This new series of paintings for his solo show entitled 'Diary (In the Midst of it)' represents a development and change in Peacock's work. They are striking, reflective and deeply atmospheric. Craig says of his work: "Painting encompasses method and process that to the viewer may appear linear. However, painting is time based, past, present and notions of the future influence its production. The work is a culmination of subjective thought, ti,e, place and process. A time of personal reflection spent in the studio. It is situational, notational, a narrative diary with no conclusion, only a blank canvas." On visiting his studio to view and select the work for this solo exhibition, we were struck by the intensity and quality in these new paintings. Craig Peacock's solo show is long overdue on the walls of Compass Gallery, where he first started his exhibiting career. Since then his career and exhibitions have been varied and numerous, in galleries in Glasgow, Scotland, London, Brussels, Switzerland and Germany. We hope that you will visit the gallery and enjoy seeing this interesting exhibition.

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Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vivamus a libero sed ipsum feugiat malesuada non et neque. Fusce ultrices augue eros, ac pharetra diam porta ut. Maecenas ac tortor non ante scelerisque hendrerit. Aenean scelerisque, quam eu rutrum tincidunt, metus urna condimentum justo, et vestibulum tortor purus vitae nulla. Proin quis enim euismod, tempus sem sit amet, egestas elit. Aenean in arcu ac neque sollicitudin condimentum at a urna. Maecenas et lorem sit amet felis eleifend hendrerit non vel diam. Phasellus molestie iaculis nibh eu posuere. Sed mattis metus eu arcu suscipit varius. Nam feugiat dui vitae placerat consequat. Aliquam hendrerit scelerisque felis sit amet porttitor. Aenean eros orci, accumsan vitae turpis sed, pulvinar malesuada ligula. Nulla rutrum metus a erat gravida condimentum. Nunc ultricies neque non purus rutrum pulvinar. Duis quis auctor lectus.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vivamus a libero sed ipsum feugiat malesuada non et neque. Fusce ultrices augue eros, ac pharetra diam porta ut. Maecenas ac tortor non ante scelerisque hendrerit. Aenean scelerisque, quam eu rutrum tincidunt, metus urna condimentum justo, et vestibulum tortor purus vitae nulla. Proin quis enim euismod, tempus sem sit amet, egestas elit. Aenean in arcu ac neque sollicitudin condimentum at a urna. Maecenas et lorem sit amet felis eleifend hendrerit non vel diam. Phasellus molestie iaculis nibh eu posuere. Sed mattis metus eu arcu suscipit varius. Nam feugiat dui vitae placerat consequat. Aliquam hendrerit scelerisque felis sit amet porttitor. Aenean eros orci, accumsan vitae turpis sed, pulvinar malesuada ligula. Nulla rutrum metus a erat gravida condimentum. Nunc ultricies neque non purus rutrum pulvinar. Duis quis auctor lectus.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vivamus a libero sed ipsum feugiat malesuada non et neque. Fusce ultrices augue eros, ac pharetra diam porta ut. Maecenas ac tortor non ante scelerisque hendrerit. Aenean scelerisque, quam eu rutrum tincidunt, metus urna condimentum justo, et vestibulum tortor purus vitae nulla. Proin quis enim euismod, tempus sem sit amet, egestas elit. Aenean in arcu ac neque sollicitudin condimentum at a urna. Maecenas et lorem sit amet felis eleifend hendrerit non vel diam. Phasellus molestie iaculis nibh eu posuere. Sed mattis metus eu arcu suscipit varius. Nam feugiat dui vitae placerat consequat. Aliquam hendrerit scelerisque felis sit amet porttitor. Aenean eros orci, accumsan vitae turpis sed, pulvinar malesuada ligula. Nulla rutrum metus a erat gravida condimentum. Nunc ultricies neque non purus rutrum pulvinar. Duis quis auctor lectus.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vivamus a libero sed ipsum feugiat malesuada non et neque. Fusce ultrices augue eros, ac pharetra diam porta ut. Maecenas ac tortor non ante scelerisque hendrerit. Aenean scelerisque, quam eu rutrum tincidunt, metus urna condimentum justo, et vestibulum tortor purus vitae nulla.

'I first exhibited work inspired by Robert Burns in 1986, and then for the Mitchell Library in 1990 and most recently, at Compass Gallery, for the 250th Anniversary of the Poet’s birth, 2009. As I made this work, I became more and more interested in the complex person revealed by extraordinary range of ideas and feelings explored in the poems, and consequently, began to read biographies and letters. In looking at the few (but varied) life portraits we have of Burns (visual & verbal descriptions), I began to question whether the extant visual portraits reflect the enormous complexity of his character, interests and changing life circumstances. The sculptures and drawings are conjectured portraits of Burns, from the age of about 4 or 5 years of age to his death bed, including his early teens, twenties and thirties. They refer to times of happiness, depression and illness as well as ideas and images about his views on politics, poetry and religion. I hope there will be humour as well as pathos in these works and that as a related series, will help to broaden the perhaps narrow perception we currently have of Burns through the visual language of art, in the way that contemporary research and biographies are doing in print’. Peter Bevan – Portraits of the Poet, January 2010

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vivamus a libero sed ipsum feugiat malesuada non et neque. Fusce ultrices augue eros, ac pharetra diam porta ut. Maecenas ac tortor non ante scelerisque hendrerit. Aenean scelerisque, quam eu rutrum tincidunt, metus urna condimentum justo, et vestibulum tortor purus vitae nulla. Proin quis enim euismod, tempus sem sit amet, egestas elit. Aenean in arcu ac neque sollicitudin condimentum at a urna. Maecenas et lorem sit amet felis eleifend hendrerit non vel diam. Phasellus molestie iaculis nibh eu posuere. Sed mattis metus eu arcu suscipit varius. Nam feugiat dui vitae placerat consequat. Aliquam hendrerit scelerisque felis sit amet porttitor. Aenean eros orci, accumsan vitae turpis sed, pulvinar malesuada ligula. Nulla rutrum metus a erat gravida condimentum. Nunc ultricies neque non purus rutrum pulvinar. Duis quis auctor lectus.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vivamus a libero sed ipsum feugiat malesuada non et neque. Fusce ultrices augue eros, ac pharetra diam porta ut. Maecenas ac tortor non ante scelerisque hendrerit. Aenean scelerisque, quam eu rutrum tincidunt, metus urna condimentum justo, et vestibulum tortor purus vitae nulla.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vivamus a libero sed ipsum feugiat malesuada non et neque. Fusce ultrices augue eros, ac pharetra diam porta ut. Maecenas ac tortor non ante scelerisque hendrerit. Aenean scelerisque, quam eu rutrum tincidunt, metus urna condimentum justo, et vestibulum tortor purus vitae nulla.

The exhibition will include works by the following artists: Craigie Aitchison, Elizabeth Blackadder, Robert Clatworthy, Fred Cuming, Anthony Eyton, Donald Hamilton Fraser, Albert Irvine, Allen Jones, Joe Tilson & David Tindle. This exhibition is in association with Advanced Graphics, London

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vivamus a libero sed ipsum feugiat malesuada non et neque. Fusce ultrices augue eros, ac pharetra diam porta ut. Maecenas ac tortor non ante scelerisque hendrerit. Aenean scelerisque, quam eu rutrum tincidunt, metus urna condimentum justo, et vestibulum tortor purus vitae nulla.

As committed figurative painter. His graduation show in 1991 was one of the most exciting and coherent series of paintings by Glasgow painters of any age in recent years. This is his first one-man exhibition.

Tramway, 25 Albert Drive, Glasgow, G41 " As an event it brings together one of the city's' latest initiatives in the visual arts with what has now become one of the most established and respected champions of contemporary artists. As a celebration it combines 21 years of success, innovation and support, with Glasgow's title as Cultural Capital of Europe. The latter would have been impossible with out the former'' - Tessa Jackson, Visual Arts Officer, Glasgow, 1990. Artists Involved: Norman Ackroyd, Craigie Aitchison, Ian Barr, John Bellany, Peter Bevan, Bill Birrell, Ronald Birrell, CLiff, Bowen, Arthur Boyd, James Boyd, Neil Dallas Brown, Dennis Buchan, John Busby, Fred Bushe, Joyce W Cairns, Steven Campbell, Anthony Caro, Grant Clifford, Douglas Cocker, Dave Cohen, James Cosgrove, Bel Cowie, William Crosbie, William Crozier, Fred Crayk ,Anthony Davies, Joan Eardley, Eskimo Art, Iam Fearn, J.D Fergusson, Ronald Forbes, Alexander Fraser, Terry Frost, Paul Furneaux, William Gear, Carole Gibbons, James Gibson, Sir William Gilles, Anne Grebby, Lys Hansen, Jim Hardie, Adrian Heath, Josef Herman, Roger Hilton, Barry Elliot Hirst, Paul Hodges, Ian Howard, Peter Howson, John Hoyland, John Inglis, John Johnston, William Johnstone, Michael Kenny, Balraj Khanna, Cecil King, Bryan Kneale, Jack Knox, Bet Low, Kaye Lynch, Malcolm McCoig, Ian McCulloch, Adrian McCurdy, Tom MacDonald, Jock McFadyen, Johnny McGuinness, Keith McIntyre, Ian McKenzie Smith, Peter McLaren, Talbert Mclean, Will Mclean, Neil MacPherson, Michael McVeigh, Margaret Mellis, Chuck Mitchell, Denis Mitchell, James Morrison, Alberto Morrocco, Peter Nardini, Jacki Parry, Anda Paterson, Robin Philipson, Frank Pottinger, Ronald Rae, Martin Rayner, Philip Reeves, Eric Ritchie, Barbara Robertson, Michael Roschlau, Carlo Rossi, Margot Sandeman, Ian Scott, Dennis Shields, Gregor Smith, Max Sollner, Mark Stanczyk, Norman Starszakowna, Tim Stead, Eddie Strachan, Edward Summerton, John Taylor, Douglas Thomson, France Thwaites, James Tweedie, Keith Vaughan, Arthur Watson, Alison Watt, Karl Weschke, Cyril Wilson, Helen Wilson, Sylvia Wishart, Adrian Wiszniewski